The SAIMM is a professional institute with local and international links aimed at assisting members source information about technological developments in the mining, metallurgical and related sectors.
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Mining Weekly | Africa

The latest mining world news and project information from Africa.
  • After 2017 consolidation, mining to pre-empt future metals demand – EY
    With stronger balance sheets across the mining and metals sector, miners are increasingly returning to an investment-led strategy, which is driving a renewed focus on building portfolios that deliver sustainable shareholder returns, says multinational consultancy Ernst & Young (EY). The focus shifts from debt reduction to creating shareholder value. Increasing productivity as demand for metals improves will mean more working capital requirements for many companies, while others may refinance high-cost facilities.
  • Contractors start FEED study at Stellar’s Sierra Leone project
    The front-end engineering and design (FEED) study for the underground mine development at Aim-listed Stellar Diamonds’ Tongo-Tonguma project, in Sierra Leone, is now under way. Stellar on Tuesday said a team of five consultants from contractors Paradigm Project Management (PPM) and SRK Consulting have arrived on site to start the various work streams related to FEED study.
  • New Toyota magnet cuts dependence on key rare earth metal for EV motors
    Toyota Motor Corp has found a way to reduce the amount of a key rare earth metal used in magnets for electric car motors by around 20%, which could tame the cost of producing electric cars and reduce the risk of a supply shortage of materials needed for their production. The Japanese automaker on Tuesday said it had developed a magnet which replaces some of the neodymium, a rare earth metal used in the world's most powerful permanent batteries, with more abundant and cheaper lanthanum and cerium, adding that it aimed to use the magnets in electric vehicle motors within the next 10 years.