The SAIMM is a professional institute with local and international links aimed at assisting members source information about technological developments in the mining, metallurgical and related sectors.
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 SAIMM Logo 1894-20145  

The Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM) has redesigned our logo to coincide with our 120th Anniversary. This logo is more aligned with the changes over the last two decades, while maintaining the professionalism that the SAIMM is renowned for. We have also emphasized the fact that we are 120 years old, and have continued to maintain our technical excellence with regard to our Journal and the events that we organize. To add to these achievements we continue to increase our membership.

The Parts of an Achievement of Arms and their Significance

The arms under consideration comprise separate parts, viz. Shield, Helm, Mantling, Crest, Supporters, Compartment, and Motto.

The Shield: This is in blue divided by a golden chevron, to represent the major sections of the industry. The flaming crucibles in the upper section represent Metallurgy and the crossed pick and shovel in the lower section represent Mining.

The Helm: This is an Esquire’s Helmet, which is the customary type of use for the arms of corporate bodies.

The Wreath and the Mantling: These are always in the two main ‘colours’ of the shield, in this case gold as a metal and blue as the colour. The mantling was originally a short cloak draped from the helmet as a protection against the sun, and the wreath helped to hold the crest in place.

The Crest: This served as an additional mark of distinction. In this case the demi-lion represents strength and holds the national flower of South Africa in his left Claw.

The Supporters: In this case heraldic beasts have been chosen, symbols of these ancient professions, the black lion representing mining and the golden dragon representing metallurgy. The ‘different’ marks on their shoulders are carried over from the shield of the Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Society, and their colours and the diamonds in their collars are intended to represent the main fields of mining in South Africa, namely gold, coal, and diamonds.

The Compartments: This is, appropriately, an outcrop of rock.

The Motto: ‘Capaci Occasio’ has been taken over from the Institute’s predecessor, the Chemical, Mining and Metallurgical Society, with the exhortation, ‘to the capable the opportunity’.

                               

 

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