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MineSAFE 2013 Conference looks beyond the 2013 milestones

altThe annual MineSAFE Conference – now in its fifth consecutive year - was once again a major success, drawing more than 400 delegates over the two-day Technical Conference and over 780 guests for the Industry Awards Day.

Held from 22 to 24 October 2013 at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg, this year's conference focused primarily on the industry's progress towards the 2013 Milestones as agreed to at the 2003 Mine Health and Safety Summit.

International Honours for two Wits Engineers

Hu Hanrahan, Professor Emeritus in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering at the University of the Witwatersrand has been reappointed as Chairperson of the Washington Accord for the term June 2013 to June 2015. He has served as Chairperson since 2011.

SAIMM Career Development Day - 13 August 2013

T he Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM) acknowledges the need to focus on our youth in South Africa. SAIMM’s subcommittee on Career Guidance and Education, arranged a student career development day at the Sci-Bono Centre in Newtown, Johannesburg. The event, which took place on 13 August 2013, was sponsored by the SAIMM, Sound Mining and the University of Johannesburg.

SANCOT and the International Tunnelling Association (ITA)

The South African National Committee on Tunnelling (SANCOT) was formed in 1973 during a phase of extensive infrastructure development in South Africa, in particular the construction of the km long Orange- Fish tunnel. This followed the success of the 1970 TUNCON conference in Durban, after which it was decided that it would be useful to form a body covering the interests of owners, designers, contractors, researchers, and suppliers in the underground construction industry. SANCOT has been active since this time, promoting the use of underground space, exchanging information, and arranging conferences and seminars.

The looming skills crunch in mining and the need to join hands

Mining schools in South Africa have taken advantage of the global slowdown to significantly roll back skills shortages in the mineral sector, but academia and business need to boost their educational partnerships to avoid being caught short by the next recovery.

The output of graduates in mineral-related disciplines rose substantially in recent years – driven in part by increased involvement of the private sector in university course offerings. The Mining Qualifications Authority reported in 2011, for instance, that graduations in chemical engineering had risen 13.5 per cent annually, followed by geology at 13.3 per cent, metallurgical engineering at 12.9 per cent, mechanical engineering at 9.9 per cent, and electrical engineering at 7.8 per cent. While this is by no means enough to eradicate the shortages our industry faces, it is an encouraging trend that demonstrates what can be achieved by effective partnerships.

SANCOT and the International Tunnelling Association (ITA)

The South African National Committee on Tunnelling (SANCOT) was formed in 1973 during a phase of extensive infrastructure
development in South Africa, in particular the construction of the km long Orange-Fish tunnel. This followed the success of the 1970 TUNCON conference in Durban, after which it was decided that it would be useful to form a body covering the interests of owners, designers, contractors, researchers, and suppliers in the underground construction industry. SANCOT has been active since this time, promoting the use of underground space, exchanging information, and arranging conferences and seminars.

Introduction to our new President...

MAREK DWORZANOWSKI: Marek was born and educated in the United Kingdom. He attended the University of Leeds where he studied Mineral Processing, graduating in July 1980 with a BSc Honours. During 1979 he worked as a vacation student at Hartebeestfontein gold mine in South Africa and decided that on graduation he would start his mining career in South Africa. As it turned out he has spent his entire mining career to date in South Africa. Marek was recruited by Union Corporation, just before it became Gencor, in 1980. He decided that he would not start his career at a gold or coal mine but instead started at Impala Platinum in Rustenburg. His first job was as a concentrator metallurgist at the central mineral processing plant, where he underwent a graduate training programme followed by project work on cyclone classification and flotation reagents.

Report for ITA World Tunnel Congress 2013, February 2013

The South African National Committee on Tunnelling (SANCOT) remains active in promoting tunnelling and the use of underground space. SANCOT functions as a committee within the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM).

On 3 December 2012 SANCOT held a one day seminar entitled ’South African Tunnelling 2012 – Lessons Learnt on Major Projects’ followed by a half day visit to the Ingula Pumped Storage Project the following day.

PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS 2013

The role of metallurgy in enhancing beneficiation in the South African mining industry M. Dworzanowski

Beneficiation, in the context of this paper, has two distinct definitions. From an economic perspective beneficiation relates to adding value to a mined raw material as opposed to simply exporting the raw material, in which case other countries will benefit from the value add potential. From a metallurgy perspective beneficiation relates to processes used to upgrade the mined raw material. Clearly then, 'economic beneficiation' is dependent on 'metallurgical beneficiation'. South Africa possesses the world's largest mineral resources by value and is the world's largest producer of many mined commodities.

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Mining Weekly | Africa

The latest mining world news and project information from Africa.
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